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Endler Livebearer Info (Poecilia wingei) Endler's

Discussion in 'Livebearer Fish' started by Anthony, May 27, 2008.

  1. Anthony

    Anthony Thread Starter Active Member

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    Endler's Livebearer were discovered in 1937 by Franklyn F. Bond, in northeastern Venezuela. Remaining unknown to anyone else, they were later rediscovered by John Endler in 1975. John A. Endler collected Poecilia sp. now, "Endler's Livebearer" in 1975 from Laguna de Patos, Cumana, in northeastern Venezuela. They have been found in surrounding areas in the past few years. They were found in warm (81 degrees F) , hard water which was very green with algae. Plankton such as diatoms, nekton, and filamentous algae make up part of their daily diet.

    These fish are now distinguished from the guppy as a separate species. They are now called Poecilia wingei. Because they are closely related to the guppy they should not be kept in the same tank. They will interbreed and produce hybrids which will damage the purity of these fish. There are three classes of Endler's. Class N (Which I keep) are pure and can be traced back to their collection site. Class P are also pure but cannot be traced. Then there is class K. These are hybrid fish that are usually Endler and Guppy mixes but will also breed with swordfish, mollies, and platies.

    The shape of the male is very similar to a wild guppy. The position of the tails and gonopodium are similar although the shape of the dorsal fins are significantly different and there are no fancy tails like guppies. That being said, sword tails are known to be visible. Male Endler's are smaller (About 3/4") than male guppies and females are smaller (About 1") than female guppies. The two fins that set these fish apart are the dorsal fin and the caudal fin.

    General Care
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    -Tank Temperature: 68-82 Degrees Fahrenheit
    -Breeding: Live Bearing Fish (Give Birth To Live Fry)
    -Feeding: Most Any Food. I Feed Mine Spirulina and Dainichi Color FX That I Crush Finely
    -Plants: Fry Need Lots Of Hiding Places. Adults Normally Do NOT Eat The Fry. Java Fern Is A Great Beginner Plant That Offers Enough Cover That Fry Will Survive.
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    Information Below Thanks To galilee of EndlersRUs

    Location: Venezuela: Laguna de los Patos and Laguna Malaguena near Cumana.
    Size: male: 2.5cm (¾-1in) female: 4cm (1¾in)
    Description: A small guppy like fish. Has an elongated, slender body with a pointed head. The males display a wide variety of striking colors and patterns in an "art deco" form, which give a neon, or metallic effect. The dominate colors being orange, red, and green, with some black and blue as well. An accurate description of this fish proves to be impossible due to variances in different populations. On one expediton to the native habitat, 7-8 different morphs were observed. At best, this profile will serve as a basic outline. The color patterns start on the top, behind the eye, and runs to the base of the dorsal fin. On the sides starting behind the eye, starts a patch that runs about mid-way to the dorsal fin, from there another color patch begins. A black mark is usually seen on the sides, starting at the pectoral fin extending upward to the bottom of the dorsal fin. This mark can be descibed as a bloch, or dash, which can be horizontal or tilted toward the dorsal fin. On some aquarium strains this dash maybe absent and replaced by another patch of color. About halfway along the body another patch may begin from the dorsal fin, extending towards the caudal fin, stopping about midway. From here another begins, ending at the base of the caudal fin. These patches of color, can be over shadowed by light black marks. The patterns of the males are similar but not identical. The dorsal fin is fan shaped and can be brightly colored, partly colored, edged in black, or clear. The pectoral fins are mainly colorless, but black pectoral fins have been observed. Most males exhibit a sword on the caudal fin that is rudimentary, meaning the outer rays on the edge of the caudal fin being colored. These colored rays can be at the top, bottom, or both, with clear rays in the middle, giving the caudal a sword-tail appearance, with the top sword being shorter. On occasion a true bottom sword may be observed, 2-3 rays wide and running out from the caudal fin at 1/16-1/8 inch. The females are larger and look very similar to a female guppy but the body is slightly more elongated. They can have a pale yellow, silverish-gray, or olive body color with colorless fins. Rarely a female may exhibit some small dark spots along the lower flanks toward the base of the caudal peduncle, and on the base of the caudal fin as well. A dark gravid spot can be seen near their vent.
    Habitat: Found in just a few groundwater fed mangrove lagoons, thick with algae and sparse vegetation. At certain times of the year these lagoons can be mixed with sea water.
    Temperature: 24-28c (75-82F)
    pH: 7.5-8.5
    Lighting: bright
    Food: Omnivorous. Flake, frozen, and live foods. Will nibble on plants and algae, should be supplemented with vegetable matter.
    Swimming area: All levels
    Aquarium set up: Plants, stones, roots, slight water movement.
    Behavior: Schooling fish. non aggressive, can be kept in the community tank with like sized fish.
    Reproduction: Livebearer. Gestation 23-24 days, 4- 20 fry in a drop which could be spread out over the course of a couple of days. Fry not threatened by the parents but should have cover for the first few days.
    Difficulty: Easy
    Tank size: Small 40-80 liters (10-20 gal)
    Additional comments: Endlers can tolerate a wide range of water conditions. Have been found in highly polluted water and green water. Seem to prefer vegetated areas.
     
  2. Anthony

    Anthony Thread Starter Active Member

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    I just wanted to add to this that is seems as if these fish are becoming endangered if not already.
     
  3. Anthony

    Anthony Thread Starter Active Member

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    According to Wiki...
     
  4. Jaren117

    Jaren117 New Member

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    Where did you get the class n endlers?? I live in arcadia ca and can you tell me where is the nearest place where I can get it
     
  5. Anthony

    Anthony Thread Starter Active Member

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    You can't buy them in stores. You have to buy them from other fish keepers normally.
     
  6. Jaren117

    Jaren117 New Member

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    So can I buy them from you? where do you live us va or another country
     
  7. Jaren117

    Jaren117 New Member

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    and do you have a care sheet
     
  8. Anthony

    Anthony Thread Starter Active Member

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    Virginia ... USA... East Coast. Yes, I sell them.

    I don't have a "care sheet". They just need basic fish care. Because they're so small they shouldn't be kept with larger fish obviously. They do best in a species only tank. Their water parameters and temperature can all be found above under "General Care'.
     
  9. Jaren117

    Jaren117 New Member

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  10. susankat

    susankat Member

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    Great write up on the fish. I got mine from the last collection that Adrian and Armondo did a few years ago before it became to dangerous to go into the areas to collect.

    There is a species maint protection program on them as I am involved in that.
     
  11. Jaren117

    Jaren117 New Member

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    anyways, how do you tell if the endler is a male or a female at the youngest possible age and how do males look like and how do females look like
     
  12. MasterBlue

    MasterBlue Active Member

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    Endler's are very similar to guppies. Male show color, while females are a drab Grey to brown.
     
  13. Jaren117

    Jaren117 New Member

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  14. susankat

    susankat Member

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    Here is a pic of males and females.

    ai2.photobucket.com_albums_y13_susankat_IMG_0843_edited.jpg
     
  15. Anthony

    Anthony Thread Starter Active Member

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    What type are they ?
     
  16. susankat

    susankat Member

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    Those are black bars.
     
  17. MasterBlue

    MasterBlue Active Member

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    look more like a wilder type =3
     
  18. Anthony

    Anthony Thread Starter Active Member

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    Yeah. That's not a black bar.
     
  19. susankat

    susankat Member

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    Yes they are the wild black bars. Those came from the collection of Adrian and Armondo when they got back from collecting them.
     
  20. MasterBlue

    MasterBlue Active Member

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    Ah, so these are the "wild" type before any selective breeding.
    They lack the significant swords I'm used to, and the black is actually quite impressive. They also seem to have a slight dot in the tail, similar to the peacock.