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Wingless Fruit Flies Article

Discussion in 'Aquarium Equipment & Decor' started by Anthony, May 17, 2009.

  1. Anthony

    Anthony Thread Starter Active Member

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    by Charles Drew

    Over the years I have had Wingless Fruit Flies on several occasions. The fruit fly is an excellent food for many small surface-feeding fish, killies, pencilfish and hatchetfish to name a few. The main drawback to my raising these flies has been the lack of information and the cost and inconvenience of having to order the culture medium from a laboratory supply. Through checking a number of sites on the web I have been able to come up with a mixture of my own. The basic ingredient was always the same but the additives made the difference. Also some mixtures had too much of some things and others not enough.

    First is the container you should use. Any jar can do but the easiest is a one quart or litre fruit jar or sealer. Put a piece of cloth over the top and screw on the ring and you have a fully ventilated jar. Some recommend just punching holes in a jar lid but if the holes are too big the wild winged type of flies (sometimes called banana buzzards) can get in and your whole culture will take flight.

    Second, get a piece of the plastic mesh that is used to do needle work on. This should be cut into a strip that goes from the bottom to almost the top. This allows the flies to get out of the culture medium and is much better than cardboard or popsicle sticks.

    Third, you can buy almost every thing you need in the bulk food store. Pure Apple Cider Vinegar, Brewers Yeast, Corn Flour, Granulated Sugar and Mashed Potato Flakes. Using a measuring cup add 1/4 cup of the potato flakes, 2 teaspoons of the corn flour, 1 teaspoon of the brewers yeast and a 1/4 teaspoon of sugar. Then add the apple cider vinegar in small amounts until it becomes a paste with a smooth buttery texture. (The apple cider vinegar is a mold inhibitor.)

    Last, sterilize the jar with boiling water and put in your mixture. It should be about ¾ of an inch thick on the bottom. Tap the jar to spread it level. Next add the plastic ladder. Using a funnel made by cutting the bottom off of a large plastic pop bottle I shake about 30 flies into the new jar. In a few days tiny maggots can be seen on the sides of the jar. As they grow, they go into pupae stage on the sides of the jar. A few more days and they will come out as flies. A new culture can produce flies in as little as 12 days depending on temperature. Set up a new culture every few days and you will never run out.
     
  2. stevenrox

    stevenrox New Member

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    cool but i heard they stink
     
  3. MOD_Dawn

    MOD_Dawn Active Member

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    too nasty for me, my lfs has them and all I can think about when I see them is where's the fly swatter!
     
  4. stevenrox

    stevenrox New Member

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    yea same with crickets
     
  5. MOD_Dawn

    MOD_Dawn Active Member

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    don't even get me started on them. Ugh! Nasty lil buggers.
     
  6. stevenrox

    stevenrox New Member

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    i got one from petsmart (i know but they had cickets lol!!!) and it had wings.... i ended up throwing them away