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10 gallon Fry Tank

Discussion in 'Freshwater Aquariums & Fish Photos' started by MOD_Dawn, Aug 1, 2010.

  1. MOD_Dawn

    MOD_Dawn Thread Starter Active Member

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    shirt tetras, lol. sorry..just had to tease ya!

    Kinda sorta kinda...the black skirts have the wispy under fin and BOLD wider barring imo.
     
  2. Anthony

    Anthony Active Member

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    LoL woops, skirt, yeah. I meant minus the fins, their body shape mainly.
     
  3. MOD_Dawn

    MOD_Dawn Thread Starter Active Member

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    oh yeah then, the body shape is about spot on with the skirt tetras.
    I'm anxious to see what color they turn into..right now their sorta a platinumy gold coloration.
     
  4. buzz4520

    buzz4520 Well-Known Member

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    they're looking really good ! !
     
  5. MasterBlue

    MasterBlue Active Member

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    how long till they color up ya think?
     
  6. MOD_Dawn

    MOD_Dawn Thread Starter Active Member

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    Thanks Buzz, and as far as how long until they color...I have no clue?
    I've no experience with the Discus so this is all fairly new to me.
    But they kinda have a orangish hue to them now compared to looking platinumy gold (like a goldfish color).
     
  7. buzz4520

    buzz4520 Well-Known Member

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    i was reading some fish articals on-line and i came across this in one of them about discus size/coloring.



    Young Discus fish are normally sold when they are roughly the size of a 50 cent coin, and at this size they all look like Brown Discus since they have not developed their adult coloration yet. For some variants, the adult coloration will not begin to show until the fish is at least a year old.

    At six months of age, well-kept juvenile discus fish will be half grown and have reached roughly the same diameter as a tennis ball. Most varieties will show at least hints of their adult coloration, but as mentioned above, some variants do not show their colors until they are over 12 months of age.
     
  8. MOD_Dawn

    MOD_Dawn Thread Starter Active Member

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    Well the 10g is now brimming with fry, I pulled almost all of them from the 20L because mom was nipping at them and displaying breeding behavior and neither parent seemed to be still creating the slime coat for the kids to feed.

    What's my plans when they start to outgrow the 10g? Well I'm thinking of putting eggcrate and dividing about a foot or less of the 90g and putting them in their (of course probably having to wrap the egg crate so they couldn't slip through) being I have no other real options. I know I have over 100 babies now!!!
     
  9. MOD_Dawn

    MOD_Dawn Thread Starter Active Member

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    Size->okay, I was thinking about 2" or so inches (so that would prolly be in line with the 50cent coin).
    Color->hmm..brown it says, mine started as a platinumy gold (kinda like a goldfish color..or at least the color of ones I had a long time back). To me they are now appearing with a orangish tinge and some even have a creme looking band (like the stress bars, but cremeish white and not black)?
    A year old! Now I definately need to go buy some patience for that wait. Ugh!
    Size->So 6 mos from the hatch date?
    *but what doesn't make sense to me is that in 6 mos they;ll be about the size of a tennis ball, but not showing true colors until roughly 6mos later? Ya'd think at that size they'd be showing their true colors considering the mother is about that size (the size of a tennis ball) and hasn't really changed color or size since I bought her at the lfs.

    Thanks so much for the info buzz! I surely appreciate it since I'm treading in unknown waters so to speak :eek:
     
  10. MasterBlue

    MasterBlue Active Member

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    Odd ...
    Maybe your have something good going then? lol
     
  11. MOD_Dawn

    MOD_Dawn Thread Starter Active Member

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    over 100 babies and no spare tanks besides a 10g...never a good thing. haha!
    So as they get a lil bigger I'll be making a diy divider for the 90g and putting them in their (to give them a bit more room to grow until their sellable size).
     
  12. buzz4520

    buzz4520 Well-Known Member

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    your very welcome. if i come across anymore info, i'll be sure and pass it along to you.
     
  13. MOD_Dawn

    MOD_Dawn Thread Starter Active Member

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    Your the bestest buzz!

    Everyone in the 10g is doing amazingly well (I was a bit worried taking them from mom & pop)...their receiving several feedings a day of Hikari frozen decapsulated Brine Shrimp, Azoo 9 in 1 Artificial Artemia, and Hikari First Bites. Seems they more actively eat the frozen decap. brine as for now..the 2 larger will literally attack the cubes as soon as they hit the water :)
     
  14. buzz4520

    buzz4520 Well-Known Member

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    thanks !! i found some more info on discus coloring...you may/may not allready know, but i thought i would post it any way...it may help others out. i know next to nothing when it comes to discus.

    Common Color Varieties
    There are three layers of color on discus: The base color (which usually ranges from cream to red-brown), the secondary color (a metallic color, usually a blue or green color) and the black pigment that makes up the black vertical bars and allows the fish to darken and lighten at will.

    Most discus strains have either a golden or reddish base color. The secondary color is often striped down the sides of the fish, although many strains (such as 'solid cobalt' or 'blue diamonds') have secondary color that eventually covers most or all of the fish's body.

    Notable color varieties:

    Wild forms:

    Brown: The most common color form in the wild; these fish have a brownish base color with minimal stripes of secondary color only along the head and fins.
    Blue/Green: Similar to the Brown, but with more secondary color (either bluish or greenish.)
    Royal Blue: The secondary color forms stripes across the entire body, with a golden base color. These splendid fish are the basis of many of the developed color strains, and are primarily responsible for the early fame of discus. Royal Blues can usually be readily distinguished from selectively bred color forms by their less even base color, with the golden color becoming a brighter yellow around the breast area.
    Red Spotted Green: A reddish base color with greenish secondary color with 'holes' in it (producing spots of the red base color showing through.) This handsome color form is extremely rare in the wild, but is produced by several breeders.
    Heckel: Possibly a separate species, Heckels are identifiable by two vertical black bars that are much thicker than the others.

    Common Bred forms:

    Red Turquoise: A red-brown base color with stripes of blue-green secondary color, normal black pigmentation (bars).
    Solid Cobalt: Golden or light brown base color, but when fully mature covered with a blue secondary color. Black pigmentation may be normal or incomplete (some vertical bars missing.)
    Blue Diamond: Essentially a 'solid cobalt', but the black bars have been completely removed through selective breeding. The reduction in black pigment gives these fish a bright, lighter blue color than most 'solid' discus.
    The Pigeon Blood mutants: These fish have a gene that disrupts the distribution of the black pigment. As a result, they lack vertical black bars (but often have 'freckles'). The lack of black pigment makes their base color much lighter and brighter; as a result, discus with this mutation may show brilliant red or yellow (or even pale cream) primary color. Most of these strains are no longer called 'pigeon bloods' per se, but are easily identifiable by the bright base color, freckles, and lack of black vertical bars. All pigeon bloods are the descendant of a single fish found in Eastern Asia in the 1980s. Since the trait is dominant and appears to be controlled by a single gene, fish bearing this mutation can be crossed with any other color strain to produce novel new 'pigeon blood' types. Pigeon bloods do have one drawback: They cannot darken at will (as normal discus can). This can make it difficult for them to raise fry, which are attracted to their parents by seeking out a dark object. (Normal discus darken when spawning or stressed.) The fish shown at the top of this document is a pigeon blood. (High quality pigeon blood types have few or no 'freckles'.)
    Snake-skins: These fish have a mutation that makes their patterning 'tighter'; as a result, they have about twice as many black vertical bars, but also have tighter, finer secondary color patterns than normal discus.

    There are no real rules or authorities on what constitutes a unique color variety or what to call it. A particular form may or may not breed 'true' (with offspring very closely resembling the patterns of their parents.) Generally all of the common, established forms breed true. The exact patterning of the secondary (blue/green) color is like a fingerprint; it develops chemically rather than being set precisely by genetics. The offspring of two 'spotted' discus will likely have spots, but not in the exact same size/position as their parents.
     
  15. MOD_Dawn

    MOD_Dawn Thread Starter Active Member

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    Thanks for all the info Buzz, found it very interesting :cool:

    Here's a photo of the babies from the other day (9-12-10).
    IMG_0595.JPG
     
  16. Anthony

    Anthony Active Member

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    You've got a nice group of fry there.
     
  17. MOD_Dawn

    MOD_Dawn Thread Starter Active Member

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  18. buzz4520

    buzz4520 Well-Known Member

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    your very welcome, glad i could help out a little. i found it very interesting also, like i said before, i know next to nothing when it comes to discus.
     
  19. MOD_Dawn

    MOD_Dawn Thread Starter Active Member

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    yea, I knew enough to get started with them and that's about it. When it came to breeding I knew absolutely nothing (hence the purchase of the Wattley Discus Breeding book) and asking for info :)
     
  20. MOD_Dawn

    MOD_Dawn Thread Starter Active Member

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    Finally found the time to run to the store and make the diy divider for the 90g...so the fishy's are now in the 90g utilizing the divider. Check out the 90 thread for more updates & photos of them!