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algae assistance

Discussion in 'Aquatic Plants & Planted Tanks' started by Anonymous, Sep 14, 2009.

  1. Anonymous

    Anonymous Thread Starter Guest

    Top Poster Of Month

    newby from Australia needs some advice

    Hi Guys,
    Thanks for the warm welcome.
    Having a bit of a problem this last day or so.

    I've had the 4ft tank set up for about 3 weeks now & have been slowly adding fish to it.
    We are rural and so our water source is creek water that does tend to be slightly orange at times as we live in a volcanic soil area.

    When I set the tank up I adjusted the ph etc until it was fine. Now I have green algae growing on the back of the tank, I bought 3 snails & 2 catfish ( I think theyre bristlenose, one bronze, one albino)

    Have a natural wooden log with fern in it that the snails love to graze on as well as the catfish and the other fish love to nibble at the leaves, also some crushed quartz (rinsed to within an inch of its life!) on the bottom , a couple of ornaments, the sponge filter. The light is left on 24/7 at the moment.

    I quarter changed the water yesterday and rinsed out the filter, they were filthy, has been 12hrs and still murky green water,. I wasnt too worried about rinsing out the sponge filter as the algae on the driftwood I thought would keep the bacteria balance in there.
    I read up on green water & it said too much sunlight, too much overhead light, feeding too often and needing a water change. Did i interpret it all ok??
    Thanks in advance, Im off to read the rest of the forum in the mean time! :D
     
  2. cooltow1

    cooltow1 Member

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    I would cut back on the light and do frequent water changes for a start.

    Rick
     
  3. LemonDiscus

    LemonDiscus Active Member

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    I agree with cooltow1:

    Cut back on the light and/or blackout the tank (no lights at all) for a few days.

    Proper lighting should be for unplanted aquariums - 6-8 hours and 7-10 hours for a planted one.

    It will take a few days of a blackout to start to stabilize the tank. With the blackout I would also cut back on feedings to VERY little or even nothing at all as well (this decreases the nutrients being added to the tank the algae likes)

    Doing those 2 things are hitting the algae at what it needs to thrive (light and food).
     
  4. Anonymous

    Anonymous Thread Starter Guest

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    First night of no light. Fish dont seem to be too worried. Catfish are a lot less active though. Havent fed them at all. How long can I keep the light off before it starts to affect the fish & the plant??
     
  5. LemonDiscus

    LemonDiscus Active Member

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    I would do 2-3 days off... It wont hurt the fish or the plants.

    I had a tank that I stored junk plants in for almost 2 months and it had no lights at all. The plants were still good when I put them back in my display tank.

    Fish can go a few days without eating too. They should be fine during the blackout.

    Once you get out of the "blackout" only put the light on for a few hours each day and slowly increase it to about 8 hours a day.
     
  6. MOD_Dawn

    MOD_Dawn Active Member

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    wow! agree with the others...slowly cut back the lighting (no more than 12 hours max on the lighting)...interp was good on the green water.

    >start with cutting back on the lighting
    >watch how much your feeding (ie. 2-3x's a day with smaller amounts is much better than 1 descent feeding)
    >Do at least a 25% water change every week and change/rinse media monthly...always add a dechlorinator any time new water is going in
    -->IF you still can't find the source/resolve the issue of the green water you may need a uv sterlizer (if you can borrow one off someone sometimes that will get you over the rough patch)....also note that newer planted tanks are also prone.
     
  7. Anonymous

    Anonymous Thread Starter Guest

    Top Poster Of Month

    our water is fresh creek/spring water so I wasnt to going to add dechlorinator again. Dumb question probably but do I check the ph after the 25% water change? I'm looking at getting a vacuum but havent looked on our Aus ebay as yet. Thanks :)
     
  8. MOD_Dawn

    MOD_Dawn Active Member

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    see if they have the Python No Spill Clean n Fill (great product)
    as for the pH I wouldn't worry about constantly checking it...the key with the pH is stability.

    With the Ammonia and Nitrite (should be 0 in cycled tank)

    With the nitrate (you want it as low as possible--> 40ppm or lower...higher #'s = More frequent water changes required or possibly larger amounts)